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Bonny Jean the Mini Bull Terrier

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Sassy the Yorkshire Terrier

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Harvey the Goldendoodle

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Jake the Siberian Husky Puppy

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Libby the Yorkshire Terrier

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Chloe the Mutt

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Lucy and Lou the Beagles

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Joanna's Yorkie Munch

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Whippet

 

 
The Whippet is a breed of dog, specifically a member of the sight hound family. They are active and playful and are physically similar to a small greyhound. Their popularity has led to the reuse of the Whippet name on a large number of things, from cars to cookies.
 

It's a dog's life - Whippets

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Appearance

Whippets are a medium-size dog averaging in weight from 25 to 40 lb (11–18 kg), with height (under the FCI standard) of 18.5 inches (47 cm) for dogs and 17.5 inches (44 cm) for bitches. Whippets tend to be somewhat larger in the United States with show, coursing and some race Whippets required to be within the AKC standard of 18.5 to 22.5 inches (48–56 cm) for dogs, and 17.5 to 21.5 inches (46–53 cm) for bitches. Because colour is considered immaterial in judging whippets, they come in a wide variety of colours and marking patterns, everything from solid black to solid white, with red, fawn, brindle, blue, or cream. All manner of spots and blazes and patches are seen, sometimes all in the same litter.

Temperament

Comment "My two whippets love going to the park and racing each other, then they become totally lazy at home"

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Whippets are generally quiet and gentle dogs, content to spend much of the day sleeping. They are not generally aggressive towards other animals, and although especially attached to their owners, they are friendly to visitors. They are not prone to snapping, so they are good with young children. Because of their friendly nature they have often been known to be used in aged care facilities. They may or may not bark when strangers arrive, and are not suited to be guard dogs due to their trusting and unsuspicious nature. They do however tend to attack cats that stray onto their territory. Outside, particularly when they are racing or lure coursing, they demonstrate their superb athletic skills and will pursue their “quarry” (even when it is an artificial lure) with the heart of a lion.

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Q. I have a Whippet Named Samison and is 10yrs old now. My question is should I get another one for a companion for him or not?

Interestingly, some whippets are to subject to "excessive greeting disorder". This unique greeting ritual is characterized by wild displays of exuberance - bounding, jumping, howling, barking, etc. - when their owners return from long absences of 10 minutes or more. This can be a problem with very young children in the house as they may easily be knocked over.

Unlike some other breeds, the males are as easy to housebreak, and no more aggressive, than females. Both sexes make excellent pets. Males are sometimes considered to be slightly more loyal and to enjoy repetitive play. Females can be a little more complex and strong-willed, but are equally devoted to their owners. Males tend to be one to two inches taller, and three to six pounds heavier, than females.

Whippets are not well adapted for living in a kennel or as outside dogs. Their coats do not provide the insulation to withstand prolonged periods of exposure to the cold. Their natural attachment to people makes them happiest when kept as house pets. They are most at home in the company of their owners, in their lap or lying next to them on the lounge. Whippets are quiet and thus well suited to apartment life, although they do need regular exercise. The chance to run free in open spaces should be made available to the whippet. Care, however, should be taken with whippets on the street as it is difficult to instil any sort of traffic sense into them.

Whippets, as their heritage would suggest (they have been called a "poor man's racehorse"), are outstanding running dogs and are top competitors in lure coursing, straight racing, and oval track racing. Typically in these events, a temporary track and lure system is set up. The lure is usually a white plastic trash bag, sometimes in conjunction with a "squawker" to simulate a sort of prey sound or with a small piece of animal pelt. With the advent of new methods in motivational obedience training being used, whippets are becoming successful obedience dogs. Many enjoy fly ball and agility.

The elegance and ease of grooming of the whippet have made it a somewhat popular show dog. It has, however, never quite gained the popularity of such dog show stalwarts as the poodle. The whippet is a sight hound with a medium to strong prey drive. A whippet can never be let off lead in an open area. He or she needs a fenced yard. Experienced whippet owners are pleased that they have not become popular like other breeds.

Health

Given proper nutrition, exercise, and veterinary care, most whippets live for 12 to 15 years. They are generally healthy, and are not prone to the frequent ear infections, skin allergies, or digestive problems that can afflict other breeds. Genetic eye defects, though quite rare, have been noted in the breed. Because of this the American Whippet Club recommends that all breeders test for this defect in their breeding stock. Hip dysplasia is unknown in whippets. Undescended testicles are common in the breed. Whippets, like most sighthounds, are sensitive to barbiturate anaesthetics.

The heart of a whippet is large and slow beating, often being arrhythmic or even intermittent when the animal is at rest. This sometimes causes concern to the owner, or to the vet not experienced with the breed. Whippets will, however, demonstrate a regular heartbeat during exercise. In a health survey conducted by The Kennel Club (UK) cardiac problems were shown to be the second leading cause of mortality in Whippets. It is not clear, however, whether this is at all related to the breed's somewhat unusual heart function.

A 2007 study identified a myostatin mutation particular to whippets that is significantly associated with their athletic performance. Whippets with a single copy of this mutation are generally very fast; those with two copies have disproportionately large musculature and are known as "bully whippets".

History

Whippets were bred to hunt by sight, coursing game in open areas at high speeds. One can find numerous representations of small greyhound-like hounds in art dating back to Roman times but the first written English use of the word "whippet" with regard to a type of dog was in 1610. There is a picture by Jean Baptiste Oudry (1686–1755) of "Misse", one of two English whippets presented to Louis XV, in the Washington National Gallery and another, with her companion, "Turlu", by the same artist in the Musée National de Fontainebleau. However, some French sources, notably the Ministry of Culture, use the word "levrette" to describe Misse and Turlu. Levrette translates as "female greyhound". In the nineteenth century, whippet racing was a national sport in England, more popular than football.

It is only beginning with this period that the existence of the whippet as a distinct breed can be stated with certainty. The age of the modern whippet dawned in 1890 when the English Kennel Club granted the breed official recognition, thus making the whippet eligible for competition in dog shows, and commencing the recording of their pedigrees. Early specimens were taken from the race track by dog fanciers of the time and exported all over the world. The whippet's versatility as a hunting, racing, exhibition or companion dog soon made it the most popular of the sight hound breeds.

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Send a picture of your dog attached to this Email, tell us a little about him or her and we will show it here.

Comments

My two whippets love going to the park and racing each other, then they become totally lazy at home

they like being spoilt

Whippet dogs racing very fast

Source

Whippets running at full speed


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